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List of Figures

Figure 1: Reflexive workflow summary diagram, showing the hierarchical role of the site, the archaeologist, the tablet and the disseminated project outputs in the knowledge-creation process at Çatalhöyük and their role in the recursive 'reflexive loop' (illustration by James Taylor, from Berggren et al. 2015, 445)

Figure 2: Tablet recording seamlessly integrated into the complex workflow of excavation in Çatalhöyük's Building 80 (photograph by Jason Quinlan, courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project). CC BY-NC 4.0

Figure 3: The integration of traditional paper recording and the tablet workflow, during the 'paperless' transition at Çatalhöyük (photograph by Jason Quinlan, courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project). CC BY-NC 4.0

Figure 4: Discussion of units being recorded by excavators at Çatalhöyük (photograph by Jason Quinlan, courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project). CC BY-NC 4.0

Figure 5: Scott Haddow from the Human Remains team at Çatalhöyük performing 3D Data acquisition using structure from motion techniques on a burial in Building 17 (photograph by Jason Quinlan, courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project). CC BY-NC 4.0

Figure 6: Multiple 3D models recorded during the excavation process of this burial (Feature 3686). These were used to reinterpret this particular burial in the field when the team recognised in the sequence of models the presence of an otherwise unknown 'skull retrieval pit', shedding light on the curious practice of posthumous skull curation at Çatalhöyük. Ordinarily the skeleton and the cut might have only been recorded once each by analogue planning (since this process is more laborious) and evidence for the cut could easily have been missed (from Knüsel et al. 2013)

Figure 7: Screenshot from tablet of the ÇRP's intra-site GIS showing digitised unit footprints overlaying ortho-rectified photograph of Çatalhöyük's Building 118. Other layers have been incorporated into the structure of the GIS in order to allow more interpretative elements of the recording process to be retained (including, for example, hachures and planning conventions). Ortho-rectified photo derived from 3D model of structure (photographic acquisition and 3D models: Nicoló Dell'Unto)

Figure 8: Video outlining the digital workflow for tablet recording at Çatalhöyük (video by Jason Quinlan, James Taylor and Justine Issavi). This video has no sound.

Figure 9: 3D model of the north room of Building 97 (generated by Julius Lundin), the west wall of Building 43, and the southern and south-eastern corner of Buildings 17, 6 and 24 (see also Figure 10). This sequence was particularly complex stratigraphically, and the section through this latter sequence of structures (a legacy of James Mellaart's 1960s' campaign), although stable, was particularly inaccessible due to its height. The section itself corresponds to drawings made by previous members of the current team in the 1990s (see Figure 10). However, an ongoing Bayesian dating project at the site required its stratigraphic re-evaluation in the 2012 field season. 3D 'structure from motion' capture of the section in the field (in this case initially processed at low resolution in the field, upon the tablets themselves), allowed the excavators not only to re-record the section from a digital source, but also to reinterpret it by being able to consider it from numerous perspectives that were not readily accessible from the ground or by ladder, and which were hard to derive from conventional 2D drawn records.

Figure 10: North-facing published section through South Area Sequence (from Farid 2007, 48); Buildings 17, 6 and 24 (highlighted by the blue box) are the focus of the 3D model in Figure 9 (from Farid 2007, 48).

Figure 11: Excavators Erik Johansson and Julius Lundin excavating what remained of the walls of Building 6 and 24 in section after digital re-recording in the 2012 field season (photograph by Jason Quinlan, courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project). CC BY-NC 4.0

Figure 12: Sequence of snapshots of 3D Geographic Information System of Çatalhöyük North Area made during the excavation season 2015. Specifically, a simulation of the temporal sequence of S490 (A), Space 488 (B) and Building132 (C), (photographic acquisition and 3D models: Jason Quinlan, Marta Perlinska and Nicoló Dell'Unto; 3D GIS Nicoló Dell'Unto)

Figure 13: 3D data acquisition on site by Nicoló Dell'Unto (photograph by Jason Quinlan, courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project). CC BY-NC 4.0

Figure 14: 3D models of Building 131 displayed in the 3D GIS. The system is visualized using a tablet PC Microsoft Surface 3

Figure 15: Screenshots from tablet highlighting various types of data which can be drawn together on the tablet: (a) digitised plan overlaying legacy data, a rectified published plan from the 1990s; (b) distribution of X-Finds integrated as a point cloud with 3D models of South Area buildings in the intra-site GIS; (c) annotated Harris Matrix drawn in Microsoft Excel (images courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Resarch Project, compiled by Justine Issavi, photographic acquisition and 3D models: Nicoló Dell'Unto)

Figure 16: Co-Field Director James Taylor leading a training session on the tablet recording workflow at Çatalhöyük (photograph by Jason Quinlan, courtesy of the Çatalhöyük Research Project). CC BY-NC 4.0

Figure 17: Venn diagram showing the how the close relationship between the archaeologists, the technology that they employ, and the information/data they produce, creates a sense of 'deep integration' in the field (illustration by James Taylor)


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