Insular artefacts from Viking-Age burials from mid-Norway. A review of contact between Trøndelag and Britain and Ireland

Aina Margrethe Heen-Pettersen

0000-0002-3008-7018

Section of Archaeology and Cultural History, Museum of Natural History and Archaeology, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Email: aina.pettersen@ntnu.no

Cite this as: Heen-Pettersen, A.M. (2014). Insular artefacts from Viking-Age burials from mid-Norway. A review of contact between Trøndelag and Britain and Ireland, Internet Archaeology 38. https://doi.org/10.11141/ia.38.2

Summary

Reliquary shrine from a double burial at Melhus, Overhalla, AD 800.

This article presents a detailed overview of the Insular artefacts found in Viking-Age burials from the Trøndelag region of mid-Norway, most of which have not previously been published in English. The archaeological evidence indicates that contact between Trøndelag and the British Isles was well established at an early stage of the Viking Age. The main evidence for contact comes from the 9th century, when a number of significant patterns can be discerned. Some local concentrations of Insular goods show the continuing importance of some pre-Viking centres, while other areas suggest co-operation between several neighbouring families in order to equip and provision overseas expeditions. Later, the datable Insular artefacts indicate significant changes in the nature of contact. North Sea trading towards the end of the Viking Age appears to be affected by increasing centralisation of power in Trøndelag during the 10th century.

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