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List of Figures

Figure 1: Moesgård Museum

Figure 2: A GIF example of linear nodal narrative progression. The audience, represented by the blue dot, enters a pre-existing narrative structure at a given start point. The audience then has one option for how to progress, taking each node in turn until reaching the end. The green dot represents the available options for the audience while the purple represents completed nodes. Grey nodes represent inactive sectors. As this is a linear nodal narrative progression, only the node directly in front of the audience is available for progression, for example, if watching a movie only the next frame will be available for the audience to receive. In a museum this might be the presentation of various artefacts along a corridor presented in chronological order of discovery.

Figure 3: A GIF illustrating interaction within a nodal network structure. The audience (represented by a blue dot) enters the narrative at a given point, but is free to access nodes in any given order (free nodes represented by green). Here the audience does not revisit any nodes; however, within a nodal network structure it is possible to do so. The available options are depicted in green, while the visited nodes are represented in purple. Because the audience can enter the narrative and progress as they choose there are no inactive nodes within this set-up.

Figure 4: An example GIF of multilinear nodal narrative schema. In this instance the player's position in the narrative is represented by the blue dot, the possible story routes from the player's position are represented by green dots and the path to date is represented by a purple dot. Black links between the segments represent that it has been active or that the narrative node has the potential to still be activated. Nodes and paths that no-longer have the ability to become active are greyed out with no outline.

Figure 5: An example GIF showing the foldback form of active multilinear nodal narratives. As with Figure 4, the audience's position in the narrative is represented by the blue dot, the possible story routes from the player's position are represented by green dots and the path to date is represented by a purple dot. Black links between the segments represent that it has been active or that the narrative node has the potential to still be activated. Nodes and paths that no-longer have the ability to become active are greyed out.

Figure 6: Demonstrating the narrative nodes in Buried. Each white arrow line describes a link between discrete narrative nodes. Within the game structure you can see elements that loop, flow to linear sections, branch and combine. Within each of the nodes both discrete and omnipotent scripts can be run, activated, logged and on occasion exposed to the player so that they can influence the variables, progression and outcomes of the game.

Figure 7: A GIF demonstrating active emergent narrative as facilitated through a system. In this example the audience enters the narrative structure by means of a fixed node, then through interaction with a computational system the remainder of the narrative is proliferated.

Figure 8: Screenshot taken from the first narrative node in which the tower is introduced to the audience. The image is wrapped around four screens with the audience standing in the middle of the application.

Figure 9: A GIF demonstrating some of the emergent narratives included in the collage section at the end of the project. These narrative nodes were also planned to be interpolated into the performances by live actors.


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