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List of Figures

Figure 1: In 1994 it was acknowledged that the Foz Côa Dam would submerge the newly found Palaeolithic rock engravings in the Côa valley in Portugal. Demonstration to stop works near the construction site of the Foz Côa Dam, Vila Nova de Foz Côa, northern Portugal, around 1995 (Image: Teresa Silva). Figure 1a: Demonstration in Oporto, around 1995, against the construction of the Foz Côa Dam that would submerge the newly found Palaeolithic rock engravings in Côa Côa valley in Portugal (Image: Teresa Silva). Figure 1b: Vale Escuro Palaeolithic rock art, goat figures, Vila Nova de Foz Côa, northern Portugal (Image: Mário Reis).

Figure 2: Public guided visit to Penascosa Palaeolithic rock art, Vila Nova de Foz Côa, northern Portugal (Image: José Paulo Ruas).

Figure 3: Listed Roman Republican fortress of Castelo da Lousa, Mourão, Alentejo region of Portugal. Preparations around 2002 for its submersion by the Alqueva Dam reservoir: construction of the pyramidal protection of the archaeological site made by thousands of sand bags (Image: António Carlos Silva). Figure 3a: Listed Roman Republican fortress of Castelo da Lousa, Mourão, Alentejo region of Portugal. Preparations around 2002 for its submersion by the Alqueva Dam reservoir: completed construction of the pyramidal protection of the archaeological site made by thousands of sand bags (Image: António Carlos Silva).

Figure 4: The listed alignment of prehistoric standing stones of the Cromeleque do Xarez, Reguengos de Monsaraz, Alentejo region of Portugal, was removed to avoid submersion by the Alqueva Dam reservoir. Reassembly works were carried out in 2004 at a different location in the municipality (Image: João Marques). Figure 4a: Reinstallation of the listed prehistoric standing stones of Cromeleque do Xarez, Reguengos de Monsaraz, Alentejo region of Portugal, in 2004 in a different part of the municipality (Image: João Marques)

Figure 5: Extract of the archaeological survey plan made for one of the Alqueva’s general irrigation system on Beja Municipality: the red circle indicates the Iron Age and Late Antiquity / Early Middle Age necropolis at Carlota. Figure 5a: Carlota burials under excavation in 2010 (Image: João Marques).

Figure 6: Medieval and modern structures under excavation in 2015 at the site of the Hotel 'Corpo Santo' in Lisbon (Image: António Valongo). Figure 6a: Remains of Lisbon's 14th century city wall integrated and displayed in 2018 in the hotel's basement (Image: Ana Pereira do Vale). Figure 6b: Detail of the remains of the medieval tower, named João Bretão after a French corsair who lived there in the 15th century, integrated into the hotel (Image: Ana Pereira do Vale).

Figure 7: Opens days at the Chalcolithic settlement Cabeço Pé da Erra, Coruche (Image: Victor Gonçalves).

Figure 8: Public visits to the port structures and ship remains in Campo das Cebolas, Lisbon in 2017 (Image: João Marques).

Figure 9/Figure 9a: Exhibition Vinha das Caliças, Iron Age necropolis at Beja, EDIA headquarters in 2010 (Image: João Marques).

Figure 10: Archaeology celebration workshops and art crafts, Lisbon, AAP-MAC (Image: AAP). Figure 10a: Archaeology celebration demonstration of prehistoric cooking techniques in 2016, Lisbon, AAP-MAC (Image: José Morais Arnaud / AAP).

Figure 11: Dissemination event — Archaeology in Portugal — Recovering the Past, 2016 (Image: João Marques).

Figure 12: Itinerary exhibition — Archaeology in Portugal — Recovering the Past, 2016 (Image: João Marques).

Figure 13: Archaeologist's Portal search results for archaeological sites.

Figure 14: Groups of students participating in educational tours in Cabeço Pé da Erra, Coruche (Image: Victor Gonçalves).


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