What do we teach? What do we know? A methodology for describing archaeological skills and knowledge

John Collis

Dept. of Archaeology and Prehistory, University of Sheffield, Northgate House, West Street, Sheffield, S1 4ET. J.R.Collis@sheffield.ac.uk

Cite this as: J. Collis 2002 'What do we teach? What do we know? A methodology for describing archaeological skills and knowledge', Internet Archaeology 12. http://dx.doi.org/10.11141/ia.12.3

Summary

I recommend that we should move to a flexible, modular system, in describing courses and training, in defining the skills needed to operate as archaeologists and professional career structures, and in describing ourselves as archaeologists. A 'Thesaurus' of skills and knowledge can be constructed, with levels of expertise, which will give us a simple and flexible tool for describing the range of activities necessary to the profession. Two or three examples are discussed, and ways in which quality can be controlled without too much bureaucracy. Potentially this approach has a world-wide application.

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Last updated: Mon Jul 29 2002

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