PREVIOUS   NEXT   CONTENTS   SUMMARY   ISSUE   HOME 

List of Figures

Figure 1: Map of Roman Mediterranean France (Gallia Narbonensis) during the first century BC and first century AD. (Map drawn by the author)

Figure 2: Popular Campanian A black gloss vessels found in Mediterranean Gaul during the second-first centuries BC. (Photo and drawings by the author)

Figure 3: Map of Roman Lattara during the late-first century BC and first century AD (Map modified by the author, courtesy of Lattes excavations; ©UFRAL. This image is not covered by CC-BY 3.0 and permission will be required for any further use)

Figure 4: Map of Ambrussum, showing the position of House A of Sector 4 within the indigenous Gallic oppidum. Sector 9 is off the map farther to the north. (Map modified by the author, courtesy of Lattes excavations; ©UFRAL. This image is not covered by CC-BY 3.0 and permission will be required for any further use)

Figure 5: The decline in Italic black gloss fineware and the rise in terra sigillata at Lattara and Narbo Martius. The percentage is out of all ceramic fragments (excluding amphorae and dolia). Source of data for Blocks 30, 31, 35 at Lattara: Sanchez and Adroher (2004). For the Clos de la Lombarde at Narbo Martius (Narbonne): Sanchez (2004; 2006; 2009).

Figure 6: The difference in the percentage of terra sigillata out of all ceramics (excluding amphorae and dolia) at different sites for the first and second halves of the first century AD. Source of data for Lunel-Viel: Raynaud (2007).

Figure 7: The amount of Italic black gloss per square metre at Zone 35 of Lattara for the period 125-75 BC and the amount of terra sigillata per square metre at Sector 9 of Ambrussum for the period AD 50-100.

Figure 8: The most popular types of Gallic terra sigillata at the different archaeological sites. The percentage represents the popularity of that specific type among all identified Gallic terra sigillata types (based upon rim count) for a given archaeological context.

Figure 9: The overall most popular Gallic terra sigillata types from the different sites analysed. Inset: a fragment of a Drag. 27 cup from the excavations at Lattes. (Photo and drawings by the author)

Figure 10: The popularity of different dining vessels at different sites in Roman Mediterranean Gaul for the first century AD. The percentage represents the popularity of a given type or more general form out of the total percentage of all Gallic terra sigillata forms identified (based upon identifiable sherds).

Figure 11: The approximate proportions of Gallic terra sigillata vessels that were thrown away by archaeological context during the first century AD, representing a kind of idealised 'assemblage'.

Figure 12: The popularity of different Gallic terra sigillata dining vessels at the Maison au Grand Triclinium from the Clos de la Lombarde at Narbonne, end of the second century AD to beginning of third century AD. Source of data from Maison au Grand Triclinium (Sanchez and Sabrié 2011).

Figure 13: A comparison in the diameter of Italic black gloss and terra sigillata vessels from Lattara, Carsalade, and Ambrussum.

Figure 14: A comparison of the architecture and dining assemblages from the Maison au Grand Triclinium from Narbonne, and the courtyard houses from Sectors 4 and 9 from Ambrussum.


 PREVIOUS   NEXT   CONTENTS   SUMMARY   ISSUE   HOME 

Internet Archaeology is an open access journal. Except where otherwise noted, content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY) Unported licence, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided that attribution to the author(s), the title of the work, the Internet Archaeology journal and the relevant URL/DOI are given.

Terms and Conditions | Legal Statements | Privacy Policy | Cookies Policy | Citing IA

Internet Archaeology content is preserved for the long term with the Archaeology Data Service. Help sustain and support open access publication by donating to our Open Access Archaeology Fund.