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List of Figures

Figure 1: Grave 6260, A2 Pepperhill to Cobham road widening scheme, Kent (Allen et al. 2012), showing the in situ arrangement of pottery vessels on the remains of a table. © Oxford Archaeology.

Figure 2: Correspondence analysis scattergram showing the relationship between pottery associated with the Roman table from cemetery and settlement assemblages. For clarity, sites only are shown. Note the separation between cemetery and settlement assemblages. See Table 1 for key to sites and data on which the plot is based. Inertia: Axis 1 – 74.1%, Axis 2 – 15.6%, total inertia 89.7%.

Figure 3: Correspondence analysis scattergram showing the relationship between pottery associated with the Roman table from cemetery and settlement assemblages. For clarity, vessel classes only are shown. Key: B = beaker, C = cup, D = dish/bowl, F = flagon; See Table 1 for key to sites and data on which the plot is based. Inertia: Axis 1 – 74.1%, Axis 2 – 15.6%, total inertia 89.7%.

Figure 4: Correspondence analysis scattergram showing relationship between sites and representation of ceramic functions in individual graves. Key: S = (liquid-) service vessels, i.e. flagons and flasks; D = drinking-related table vessels, i.e. beakers and cups; F = food-related table vessels, i.e. bowls and dishes. See Table 2 for key to sites and data on which the plot is based. Inertia: Axis 1 – 51.1%, Axis 2 – 37.1%, total inertia 88.2%.


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