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A Case Study in Archaeology and Public Benefit from an Urban Excavation in an Old Brewery: Cork City, Ireland

Maurice F. Hurley

Cite this as: Hurley, M.F. 2021 A Case Study in Archaeology and Public Benefit from an Urban Excavation in an Old Brewery: Cork City, Ireland, Internet Archaeology 57. https://doi.org/10.11141/ia.57.5

Summary

Maurice Hurley reveals a wooden Viking Age weavers' sword to the Lord Mayor of Cork, Councillor Fitzgerald and Ambassador Else Berit Eikeland
Maurice Hurley (right) reveals a wooden Viking Age weavers' sword to the Lord Mayor of Cork, Councillor Fitzgerald and Ambassador Else Berit Eikeland

A major urban development in Cork City entailed dewatering and very deep excavations for new basements. This revealed significant archaeology from the Viking period, which was excavated where necessary. A very successful series of public events followed, with senior politicians visiting. This paper concludes by emphasising the need to provide the public with accurate information.

Corresponding author: Maurice F. HurleyORCID logo
mauricefhurley@gmail.com
Consultant Archaeologist

Full text

Figure 1: Beamish & Crawford Brewery, a 19th-century view and much the same view in 2010 with archaeological trial trenches under excavation. An old beer bottle with the company logo in Gaelic revival motifs

Figure 2: The remains of the church walls cut by numerous modern interventions. The tide that regularly covered the site had just receded before the photograph was taken

Figure 3: Excavation of the basement took place in stages in tandem with construction. The size of individual units was restricted because of sub-surface tidal pressure and access requirements

Figure 4: A 12th-century reclamation fence embedded in the introduced estuarine silts

Figure 5: Maurice Hurley reveals a wooden Viking Age weavers' sword to the Lord Mayor of Cork, Councillor Fitzgerald and Ambassador Else Berit Eikeland

Figure 6: The carved face of the wooden weavers' sword was a visual link throughout the exhibition literature

Camden, W. 1586 (translated 1610) 'The Author to the Reader'. Britain, or a Chorographicall Description of the most flourishing Kingdomes, England, Scotland, and Ireland, and the Ilands adjoyning, out of the depth of Antiquitie, Translated by Holland. London: Philemon. https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/40kqowa

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