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4. Historical Research by C.P. Croly

4.1 Introduction

It is at once both an exciting and a daunting prospect to write a piece on the history of the Carmelite friary in Aberdeen. Much scholarly work and attention has been paid to this friary. Although no new documents have come to light concerning the history of the Carmelite friary in Aberdeen during the course of this research, there are a number of ways to look at and examine the known documents anew. Mostly this arises out of the specific requirements of this particular project. In other regards there remain a large number of documents that have yet to be fully examined from every angle.

What has become clear during the course of this research is that the Carmelites have had a significant impact upon Aberdeen. During the course of its existence the grants of money and land and the family connections to the friary speak eloquently of the pride and devotion with which Aberdonians regarded that institution. By the time of its demise the friary had become embedded in place names and boundary descriptions in Aberdeen. The Carmelites have, in that sense, never really left the Green or Aberdeen.

This portion of the historical report is in several sections. The detailed history of the friary can be found elsewhere in the article:


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